• Callosities (Corns) Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • 1 What are Namazi corns? What are the chances of their recurrence?

    A Namazi corn is a type of corn that develops on the forehead or knees of Muslims who regularly offer Namaz by kneeling down and repeatedly touching their forehead and knees to the floor. These usually develop in the form of callosities. However, there can be corns that are painful. These are usually difficult to manage because of the repeated pressure and friction on that part while offering namaz. However, padding or soft cushions on the knees and maybe on the forehead can be used to reduce the pressure and friction and to prevent or at least delay their occurrence.

  • 2 When is it necessary to see a doctor?

    If a corn or callus persists or becomes painful despite self-care efforts, then one needs to see the doctor. People with fragile skin or poor circulation in the feet (people with diabetes or peripheral arterial disease) should consult their doctor as soon as corns or calluses develop. Further, one should seek medical care immediately if corns or calluses show signs of infection such as increasing pain, the presence of pus or other drainage, swelling, and redness.

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  • 3 What are the complications of Corns?

    Corns and calluses are generally uncomplicated. However, complications may include advanced or untreated infections leading to ulceration of the skin or infection of the blood. Infection is much more common in individuals who are unable to care for themselves or who have poor circulation or diabetes.

  • 4 What precautions should one take to avoid getting Corns?

    Reducing or eliminating the circumstances that lead to increased pressure at specific points on the hands and feet will help prevent the growth of corns and callosities in most situations.

    Some of the effective preventive measures are:

    • Wearing well-fitting, comfortable shoes is very useful.
    • Another approach is to pad up the area subjected to excessive or constant pressure, with cushioned insoles and foam pads.
    • People with fragile skin or poor circulation in the feet (such as people with diabetes or peripheral arterial disease) should consult their doctor as soon as corns or calluses develop.
    • Individuals with tendency to develop corns may need to avoid prolonged standing or walking. If job requirements dictate a certain type of footwear, such individuals may benefit from reassignment to a position in which comfortable footwear can be worn.

  • 5 What is role of Homeopathy for Corns?

    Homeopathy offers excellent treatment for corns and calluses of various types. It eliminates the problem from the root. The major difference between homeopathic treatment and other forms of treatment is that Homeopathy not only removes the present problem but also prevents it recurrence in the future. This is a unique offering of Homeopathy. Of course, the problem will recur if the 'maintaining cause' that sustains the repeated and persistent pressure at specific points remains in existence after treatment.

    Know more about how Homeopathy helps in Corns and Calluses. Click on Homeopathic Treatment for Corns and Calluses

  • 6 Are there different types of treatments for different types of Corns?

    Yes. Corns are generally treated by either of the following measures:

    • Trimming the area is one of the possibilities. A trained doctor can pare down thickened skin or trim a large corn with a scalpel.
    • Oral medicines or ointments are given in corns or calluses that have become infected.
    • For persons with an underlying foot deformity, the doctor may prescribe custom-made padded shoe inserts (orthotics) to prevent corns or calluses.
    • Surgery for corns is rarely necessary. When a corn is surgically removed, the pressure that caused it to form in the first place will just make it come back if this pressure is not removed or reduced.
    • Many people who try to remove corn and calluses by themselves find that they keep growing back, often within a matter of days. Self-treatment of corn and calluses is NOT RECOMMENDED. Injury, in the form of cuts and wounds can occur and this can be highly dangerous.

    However, none of the treatments described above can take care of recurrence of corns. They are only effective for the current problem.

  • 7 What are the causes of recurrence of Corns once removed surgically?

    When a corn is surgically removed, the pressure that caused it to form in the first place will just make it come back again if this pressure is not removed or reduced. Thus, the maintaining cause needs to be eliminated to prevent recurrence after surgical removal.

    Gain knowledge about the various treatment options for Corns and Calluses, and take an informed decision. Click on Treatment of Corns and Calluses

  • 8 Why do Corns occur in hands?

    Any activity of hands that leads to increased and persistent pressure on specific points of the hands increases the risk of developing corns or calluses on the hands. People who play stringed musical instruments like Sitar, Guitar and Violin tend to have calluses forming on their fingers; and in the case of violinists, at the neck where the violin is placed. Likewise, farmers and rowers tend to have corns and calluses on their hands. Calluses on the hands generally form at the base of the fingers.

    Know more about Corns and their manifestations. Click on Symptoms of Corns and Calluses

  • 9 Do corns and calluses occur more in women and girls than in men? Why?

    Yes. Corns and calluses have higher prevalence in women and girls than men as a result of wearing tight or ill-fitting shoes. Ladies usually prefer very tight footwear with heels which are narrow from the toe side. Such footwear cause increased pressure and friction on the toes and feet. Women who wear such footwear for prolonged periods of time are at higher risk of developing corns and calluses.

  • 10 How are Corns or Calluses diagnosed? Are there any tests by which Corns can be diagnosed?

    The diagnosis can be made by observing the characteristic changes in the skin. Specialized tests are usually not necessary. One can diagnose a corn or callus by the way it looks.

    To exclude other conditions, a skin biopsy may be necessary. Imaging studies can be used in order to detect any underlying bony abnormalities that cause abnormal pressure on the overlying skin. For this purpose, a plain radiograph usually suffices, but occasionally CT scanning is used.

  • 11 What are the causes for the development of Corns and Calluses?

    The basic cause for corns and calluses is only one, TOO MUCH PRESSURE, usually in combination with some friction. The constant or repeated pressure stimulates skin to thicken to protect itself.

    Some of the common reasons for too much pressure are:

    • Too tight Footwear: Ladies usually prefer very tight footwear with heels which are narrow from the toe side. Such footwear can cause increased pressure and friction on the toes and feet. Tight shoes squeeze the foot. High-heeled shoes squeeze the front part of the foot. Loose shoes cause the feet to slide and rub against the shoe. Shoes with a thin sole put more pressure on the ball of the foot when walking than do thick soled shoes.
    • Toe deformities: Deformities of feet such as hammer toes result in uneven distribution of pressure on the feet and toes. Some regions receive increased pressure resulting in formation of corns or calluses.
    • Bony prominences: Abnormal bony prominences result in increased friction. People who sit on the floor constantly with crossed legs can develop corns on the lateral malleoli of ankles.
    • Gait abnormalities: Biomechanical or gait abnormalities can cause increased pressure at different areas of the sole (plantar surface) of the foot. People suffering from arthritis or other joint problems walk in a typical style, which can cause increased pressure and friction at certain points leading to formation of corns and calluses.

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